Bavarian Digital Ministry

Bavarian Digital Ministry

In Munich we played at the Digital Ministry and the scenario we created drew closely from the themes of the invited:

We had Tim Christiansen of the Digital Ministry at the table, motivated to learn how the elements and mechanics of Le Grand Jeu maps onto mechanics and elements of Token Economies.

We had also invited Techgenossen, a consultancy cooperative for software with a purpose (“Software mit Sinn”). Not only have they been active supporters of Fridays for Future, but also of an initiative called “Munich must act.”

Some research revealed what inspired our Munich scenario: there was a Munich Referendum ”Clean Air” in 2017 for phasing out of a coal-powered plant. However, the Federal Grid Agency (Bundesnetzagentur) just recently forbid the shutting down of the coal-powered plant because it is “system relevant.” Germany is the biggest polluter in Europe due to its holding on to coal — Germany’s coal problem, is a social problem, at this stage not even only at a local, national, or European level — but a global one.

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HKW Nord 2 What does system relevant mean?

So, we set up a coal power plant in the middle of the board and a “wheel of sun” to emphasize the volatility of this renewable resource.

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Will the players create an alternative energy system? Or will they be too preoccupied in survival mode?
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Digital Ministry in Bavaria, Game and Interaction Designers meet at a table to play a round of Le Grand Jeu to discuss serious play for co-creation of collaborative action in complex scenarios and how it maps to token economies and cryptoeconomics.

capture of the feedback round that can be made at any round in the game, when interesting patterns emerge. In Munich we were more meta-gaming: analyzing how the game can be made useful to grasp complex systems.

Munich


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